Borrow it. Buy it. Check it Out. -Part 2

I can’t imagine a world without books to read. I still buy them in paperback and hardcover. There’s so much enjoyment in finding them a proper home in my library. It’s like I’m introducing them to friends when I find a place on a shelf with a similar genre.

Rarely do I buy e-books. I joke with my book club that I’ll be the girl everyone will want to friend when the inevitable Zombie Apocalypse occurs. I mean, I doubt people will be using their precious found energy to power their books then.

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger
ordinary grace

Just lovely. I was overly emotional when I read this and found myself struggling at times not to cry. This book is set in New Bremen, Minnesota in the year of 1961. It’s a story centered on a family in a small town.  Although this is set in a time before I was born, there are many timeless correlations.  I miss the freedom I felt growing up just riding my bike all over town for 6 or 7 hours without any fear for my safety.  It was easy for me to connect with this family. There’s tragedy. There’s unrequited love. There’s murder. It’s a story of how tragedy effects the life of a young boy. This is beautifully written.  Read it!

The Keeper of Lost Causes by Jussi Adler-Olsen
keeper of lost

This is the story of a homicide detective, Carl Morck who blames himself for not pulling his weapon when two colleagues are shot in a hail of bullets. He ends up receiving a “promotion” where he is given a bunch of cold cases to review. As he reviews files, he comes across one that he can’t put down. It’s a case on a liberal politician that just doesn’t sit right with him. He can’t believe this strong woman took her own life.  And without a body being found he’s just not convinced that she’s not alive.  His unrelenting search leads him to an amazing conclusion.   I was captivated.  I’m hooked on this author now.  This book is riveting. It’s a must read for lovers of mysteries and thrillers.

Stardust by Neil Gaiman
stardust

Okay, I’m all over the place with my book choices, but I never fail to go too long without some type of science fiction or fantasy fiction book to read. I do love Neil Gaiman’s books and this one did not fail to entertain. It’s magical.

Tristan is half fairy and half man. He is raised in a small village away from fairyland. He falls madly in love with a woman in town and promises her a fallen star for her hand in marriage. Tristan sets off on a wonderful adventure in fairyland in search of the falling star. The star is a short-tempered, beautiful woman in fairyland. (how fitting) They are bound together for some time throughout Tristan’s journey home. When Tristan returns home, he finds that he is no longer madly in love with the woman he set out to find the star and realizes that he was meant to be in fairyland after all. It’s a quick and fun read. Borrow it. Buy it. Check it out.

Borrow it. Buy it. Check it out. -Part 1

I can’t imagine a world without books to read.  I still buy them in paperback and hardcover.  There’s so much enjoyment in finding them a proper home in my library.  It’s like I’m introducing them to friends when I find a place on a shelf with a similar genre.  

Rarely do I buy e-books.  I joke with my book club that I’ll be the girl everyone will want to friend when the inevitable Zombie Apocalypse occurs.  I mean, I doubt people will be using their precious found energy to power their books then.  

So I checked into my old casa last month to take care of my dad’s affairs.  It was so odd living in the house I was raised in.  (Especially in the state it was in)  When my parents made the partial move to live near us 5 years ago, the family home became a place that my dad used like a motel.  He was still running the family business part time.  I was thankful that he kept it.  If for no other reason than it kept him from staying in cheap motels during the week.  I was sad at the state it was in. The house was empty except for a bed, a chest of drawers, a sofa and a desk and chair.  It was no longer the childhood home that I had felt safe and happy.  I moved in a table and chairs.  My loneliness was overwhelming often during my stay. There were too many empty rooms that had once held so much life. My sister joined me as often as possible and we indulged in lots of wine and tears.

At first I was too pre-occupied with grief to indulge in reading. When my sister was there we would try to listen to audio books.  When I finally felt ready to read again,  I was saddened by the lack of book stores there.  They did have a Books-a-Million and so off I went to peruse the aisles. (Murphy’s Law-I had left my book stack at home)

The Martian by Andy Weir-   Book One Review

the martian

 

The main character, Mark Watney is a brilliant botanist and astronaut.  In the beginning, Mark is on a mission with his crew.  They have made it to Mars and he is collecting soil samples when a storm comes on the crew. It’s much stronger than was anticipated.  In an extreme rush they are forced to abandon their mission. Mark’s character is impaled by an antennae which knocks him unconscious.  The puncture wound kills his vital signs on his suit and the crew thinks he is dead.  They leave Mars with a huge sadness.  They’ve lost one of the team and their mission has failed.

Mark Watney awakens to the sound of his oxygen running out and an antennae sticking out his suit.  With seconds to spare he makes it into the ship and patches himself up.  The agony-you’re stranded with no hope of surviving and you’re alone and injured.

The story at times was drawn out, but I felt it was realistically written.  I highly recommend reading this book before watching the movie.  Well, I think you should ALWAYS read the book first anyway.  In the case of this movie, I loved it.  Read it and then Watch it.

 

The Girl with all the Gifts by Mike Carey- Book Two Review

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One of my book club ladies handed this one over to me to borrow.  Without reading the book flap, I dove in.  The title was enough reason to read it.  Very soon into the book I realized there was so much more to this book than I had anticipated.  Melanie, the main character is not what you expect.  As you begin the story Melanie is with a group of other children in some type of prison.  It’s not fully clear at first why the children are being restrained.

I’m a sucker for any post apocalyptic books, so this one was right up my alley.  Be forewarned that you will find your mind racing with Melanie and her odd “band of renegades”  I was very surprised from beginning to end with this book.  The ending was not at all what I had imagined, but on reflection, I can’t imagine it ending any other way.  Read this.

The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton-  Book Three Review

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Oh how I loved this book.  I’ve since read a few negative reviews, but for me, it was perfect.  In life we aren’t promised happy endings and in books, I don’t expect them.  Like so many other books I’ve read, I started this one with only the knowledge that a close friend loved it.  I had no other thoughts about it.  It’s set in 1687, in Amsterdam.  Some reviews found it too unrealistic that such strong feminine roles would have existed then.  I can’t imagine that there would have ever been a time in history when they didn’t exist.

Nella, our main character is the new bride of Johannes Brandt.  He’s much older than she and a wealthy merchant.  He’s handsome and captivating.  It’s sad that the marriage is a simple marriage of convenience for him.  Nella arrives without this knowledge.  Johannes is a kind man and has only married at the insistence of his sister Marin who believes he must for reason that will play out in the book for you.

The book is intriguing.  I was lost in my own dream world throughout the book.  It’s a great novel.  Borrow it.  Buy it.  Check it out at your library.